Sunday, 13 September 2015 01:28

Myrmecophila (Schomburgkia) tibicinis Featured

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

LIGHT
moderate to bright light
WATER
allow to dry between watering
HUMIDITY
50% is optimum
TEMPERATURE
BLOOM SEASON
blooms in February

 

 

Treat as you would a Cattleya.

.

CULTIVATION

The International Orchid Register

Myrmecophila tibicinis

Myrmecophila
Epithet
tibicinis
Synonym Flag
This is not a synonym
Synonym Genus Name
Schomburgkia
Registrant Name
This is a natural hybrid
Originator Name
This is a natural hybrid
 

 

SOURCE: The International Orchid Register

 

The Internet Orchid Species Photo Encyclopedia

Common Name The Trumpet Player's Schomburgkia

Flower Size 2 to 3" [5 to 7.5 cm]

A giant sized, warm to hot growing epiphyte and sometimes lithophyte with several leaves that is found from Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, Costa Rica, Venezuela and Colombia in seasonally dry deciduous forests on trunks and larger branches often in full sun at elevations of 300 to 600 meters, it has huge, 18" [45 cm], sulcate, conic to cylindric pseudobulbs that are hollow and have a entrance at the base so that in the wild there are always ants living in them. There are 2 to 5 apical, elliptic-ovate leaves that blooms in the spring to 15' [450 cm] long, erect, paniculate spikes with the successively opening, fragrant flowers in a cluster at the apex so thought must be put into space so the spikes don't get broken.

These plants bloom in March or April and can be grown with year round watering although it is better to give less through the winter. These plants must be mounted on a large wood mount as they do not like to be disturbed, and it does not take long for it to cover a branch.

It can be confused with M brysiana but differs in having larger magenta flower with a larger column while M brysiana has much smaller yellow flowers with shorter columns.

The dried pseudobulbs of this species can be fashioned to make a trumpet to call the children home from their playtime hence the common name.

Synonyms

  • Bletia tibicinis [Batem] Rchb.f 1862
  • Cattleya tibicinis Beer 1854; *Epidendrum tibicinis Bateman ex Lindley 1838
  • Laelia tibicinis [Batem. ex Lindley] L.O.Wms. 1941
  • Myrmecophila grandiflora (Lindl.) Carnevali & J.L.Tapia & I.Ramírez 2001.
  • Schomburgkia brysiana var intermedia Jones 1972
  • Schomburgkia grandiflora (Lindl.) Sander 1901
  • Schomburgkia intermedia (H.G.Jones) Withner 1993
  • Schomburgkia tibicinis [Batem. ex Lindley] Batem. 1841
  • Schomburgkia tibicinis var grandiflora Lindley 1845

References

  • W3 Tropicos
  • Kew Monocot list
  • IPNI
  • The Orchids of Mexico and Guatemala Bateman 1843 as Schomburgkia tibicinisdrawing fide
  • Xenia Orchidaceae vol 2 Rchb.f 1862 as Bletia tibicinis
  • Die Orchideen Schlechter 1915 as Schomburglia tibicinis
  • Atlas des Orchidees Cultivees Constantin 1920 as Schomburgkia tibicinis drawing fide
  • AOS Bulletin Vol 26 No 2 1957 drawing as Laelia tibicinis
  • AOS Bulletin Vol 26 No 10 1957 drawing as Laelia tibicinis
  • AOS Bulletin Vol 28 No 5 1959 as Laelia tibicinis
  • AOS Bulletin Vol 28 No 10 1959 photo as Schomburgkia tibicinis
  • AOS Bulletin Vol 30 No 9 1961
  • AOS Bulletin Vol 32 No 1 1963 photo as Schomburgkia tibicinis
  • Encyclopedia of Cultivated Orchids Hawkes 1965 as Laelia tibicinis
  • Flora de Venezuela Foldats Volumen XV Part 3 1970
  • Orquideologia Vol 12 3/4 1977/8
  • AOS Bulletin Vol 47 No 6 1978
  • AOS Bulletin Vol 48 No 5 1979 as Laelia tibicinis
  • Icones Planetarum Tropicarum plate 1050 Dodson 1984 drawing fide
  • Flora Novo-Galaciana Vol 16 Orchidaceae Mc Vaugh 1985
  • Cattleyas and Their Relatives Withner Vol 3 1990 drawing/photo fide
  • Native Colombian Orchids Vol 4 COS 1992 photo fide
  • Icones Planetarum Tropicarum plate 1566 Atwwod 1993 drawing fide
  • AOS Bulletin Vol 65 No 7 1996 photo; AOS Bulletin Vol 70 No 12 2001 photo
  • AOS Bulletin Vol 75 No 3 2006 drawing
  • Orchids of Costa Rica Vol 1 Morales 2009 photo fide 

 

SOURCE: The Internet Orchid Species Photo Encyclopediag 

 

Blue Nanta

Disctribution:
Mexico to N. Venezuela
 
 
 
General Description:
Large plant, large flowers! This hot-growing orchid grows well in full sun. Naturally found Mexico, south to Columbia, clumps reach enormous size when grown outdoors on palm trees. Flower spikes can be 1.5 meters long! Large hollow stems provide homes for ants
 

SOURCE: Blue Nanta

 

DISCUSSIONS

 

Backbulbs.com by Richard Lindberg

Myrmecophila tibicinis 'H&R' x 'Jean'

The genus Myrmecophila contains 8 species that are a subset of Schomburgkia and were separated because of the hollow pseudobulbs. They are found in tropical areas of the new world.

Myrmecophila tibicinis grows from Mexico through northern South America. It is warm to hot growing, wants full sun and is fragrant. The plant is big and the spike can be as much as 15 feet long.

TRIBE: Epidendreae     SUBTRIBE: Laeliinae

Friday, July 17, 2009

The genus Myrmecophila contains 8 species that are a subset of Schomburgkia and were separated because of the hollow pseudobulbs. They are found in tropical areas of the new world.

Myrmecophila tibicinis grows from Mexico through northern South America. It is warm to hot growing, wants full sun and is fragrant. The plant is big and the spike can be as much as 15 feet long.

I just got this nice division in the mail as part of a trade. There are no live roots but the pseudobulbs, particularly the youngest, are hydrated and there are two eyes that are set to activate. I am sure that there will be no problem getting it started.

Active eye at the base of the yougest pseudobulbI cannot always see an eye at the base of every pseudobulb but there are multiple potential eyes there. That's why backbulb culture works.

In the normal development of the plant it starts new growth from the newest pseudobulb and that eye develops when the pseudobulb matures. It looks like a little tab and can easily be broken off, so handle pseudobulbs carefully.

I am glad that I have the Sonoma greenhouse. The Napa greenhouse is too small. There is plenty of room for the plant in sonoma, even a 15-foot spike, and the light is quite bright.

Reference material mentions that the plant does better mounted because it doesn't like to have the roots disturbed. That is the kind of detail I have learned to pick up on. I have some large cork pieces to place it on.

Monday, May 9, 2011

I got this Myrmecophila tibicinis 'H&R' x 'Jean' in trade in September 2009 near the end of the growing season. I potted it in a large wood basket with large cork chunks as medium and placed it a bright, warm spot in Sonoma.

Myrmecophila tibicinis grows from Mexico through northern South America. It is warm to hot growing, wants full sun and is fragrant. The plant is big and the spike can be as much as 15 feet long. The genus Myrmecophila contains 8 species that are a subset of Schomburgkia and were separated because of the hollow pseudobulbs. They are found in tropical areas of the new world.

I have been checking the plant weekly because I was interested in learning about this genus. Alas, nothing happened through the summer of 2010. In about August I added a thin top dressing of sphagnum moss. The theory was that not enough moisture was staying around the plant. Not much sphagnum, just enough to be like dead plant material falling in nature. A month later it sprouted but by then the growing season was ending.

Today I peeked and saw some lovely new roots growing on last fall's sprout. It is getting enough light, it has a nice purple blush. I would not be surprised to see a spike this year!

June 9, 2012 - Moved the plant to Napa.

Thursday, April 11, 2013

The Myrmecophila tibicinis is still alive. It is doing a little better in Napa. I moved it from Sonoma last year. No sign of blooming.

Myrmecophila tibicinis grows from Mexico through northern South America. It is warm to hot growing, wants full sun and is fragrant. The plant is big and the spike can be as much as 15 feet long. The genus Myrmecophila contains 8 species that are a subset of Schomburgkia and were separated because of the hollow pseudobulbs. They are found in tropical areas of the new world.

Since it wants full sun I think I will try growing it outside. I will hand water and see how it reacts.

 

SOURCE: backbulb.com - Richard Lindberg

 

 

 

VENDORS

 

 

 

et cetera

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the exact sme orchid that Mr. Lindberg was showcasing in his blog.  I acquired it as a raffle item in September or October (2015).  The old basket was starting to fall apart.  In November, I carefully removed the orchid and the slab of cork its roots had grown attached to.  I took the remaining cork and placed it in the old basket, and inverted that basket in a larger basket. Following Mr. Lindberg's theory, some moss is tucked on the orchid (simulating a leaf catch) and I stuffed moss under the cork slab between it and the bottom of the inverted old basket for the roots.  There is a huge gap as these orchids like to dry quickly after watering. Secured everything and added some spanish moss as decoration and "humidity helper".  Watering this orchid is by means of a three-minute shower - literally.  When I was re-arranging the orchid, I looked carefully, but did nottice any new growth except the one bulb that seems to have slowed down.  In December, to my surprise, and by accident almost breaking the new growth, I discovered 2 new growths

Photo top-left.  The orchid situated in the new basket.  It hangs in the balcony where it gets full sun most the afternoon after the mid-day heat.

Photo top-right.  A close-up peek of the new growth.  Inspired by the 3-minute shower twice a week, and misting daily?  The third newest growth is barely peeking above the cork in this angle.

Photo bottom-left.  The "stalled" old-new growth and tips of the newer growths can be seen.

Photo bottom-right.  The orchid on the balcony, with the new growth or "back" to the sun.  Every 2 days I switch the exposure to the sun between "front" and "back".  Watering via shower twice a week (December) and misting a couple times each day unless watered.

All images can be clicked to reveal larger size.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a heat tolerant, very brghit light favoring orchid ideal for conditions where I live provided misting in the AM and when real hot, a couple times per day as needed.  The next concern, is dealing with the spikes and blooms.

 

Additional images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

high light is prefered

A happy orchid

 
 

 

Numerous blooms on one spike

 

Can't find a tree to grow in - no problem. The spike will reveal where it is growing, even if on a low shrub.

 

BEST FOR LAST

 

 

 

format completed
 
Read 5874 times Last modified on Friday, 18 December 2015 23:49
More in this category: Farewell Schomburgkia »
  • No comments found

Leave your comments

Post comment as a guest

0
Your comments are subjected to administrator's moderation.

DISCLAIMER

All information presented here is for educational and informational purposes only under the guidelines of "Fair Use" policies defined by US Copyright law(s).  Some images and select text are protected by respective copyright holders. Material presented here is done so as educational, and "as is".  The Napa Valley Orchid Society, it's executive Board, General members and the web site maintainer cannot be held liable for any damages incurred.

When necessary, images and texts will be fully credited to the original.

Information here may be used by other orchid societies as long as they credit the original creator and at least mention the Napa Valley Orchid Website as a courtesy.

TOP