CYMBIDIUM ALLIANCE

CYMBIDIUM ALLIANCE (26)

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The Cymbidium Orchid

The Cymbidium Orchid (17)

(pronounced sym-BID-ee-um)

 

These orchids are prized for their long-lasting sprays of flowers, used especially as cut flowers or for corsages in the spring. There are two main types of cymbidiums - standards and miniatures. Where summer nights are warm (above 70 F), only miniatures can be recommended, because many are more tolerant of heat and able to flower in warmer weather.

 

Cymbidium, or boat orchid, is a genus of 52 evergreen species in the orchid family Orchidaceae. The new Latin genus name is derived from the Latin cymba meaning boat.

 

The Cymbidium in nature can be found in tropical and subtropical Asia (such as northern India, China, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Borneo) and northern Australia. The larger flowered species from which the large flowered hybrids are derived grow at high altitudes.

 

Cymbidium plants are sympodial and grow to a height of 60 cm and the racemes as high as 90 cm. The raceme grows from the base of the most recent pseudobulb. Each flower can have a diameter of 5 to 10 cm, according to the species. They bloom during the winter, and each plant can have up to fifteen or more flowers. The fantastic range of colors for this genus include white, green, yellowish-green, cream, yellow, brown, pink, and red [and orange] and black (and there may be markings of other color shades at the same time), but not blue. The flowers last about ten weeks. They have a waxy texture. The rounded sepals and petals have about the same dimensions.

 

There are fragrant varieties as well, notably the Chinese cymbidiums. They have been cultivated for thousands of years, especially in China. Cymbidiums became popular in Europe during the Victorian era. One feature that makes the plant so popular is the fact that it can survive during cold temperatures (as low as 7˚ C or 45˚ F) [Actually they will survive at temperatures below 32˚F for short periods and even as low as 28˚F].

 

The species Cymbidium hookerianum is considered a delicacy in Bhutan where it is traditionally cooked in a spicy curry or stew and called "olatshe" or "olachoto". It is sometimes confused with Cyclanthera pedata, another local delicacy (the nomenclature has not been clearly established; there are indications that "olatshe" usually refers to Cymb. and "olachoto" to Cycl., although not consistently).

 

additional reading and information

 

Cymbidium Society of America (CSA)

Golden Gate Cymbidium Society

Sacramento Valley Cymbidium Society

 

  

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Sunday, 20 December 2015 13:31

Propagating Cymbidiums by Backbulbs

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Anyone who has ever grown cymbidiums knows that these wonderful plants are probably the most robust growers of all the orchid family. One of the easiest but often misunderstood ways of propagating cymbidiums is through the growing of the dormant backbulbs. There is a natural tendency for these plants to drop their leaves and produce backbulbs, which, when separated at the time of repotting and sprouted, may be used to increase the size of one's collection quite easily. In this manner, one small plant may be grown and propagat­ed into many within just a few years.

(by James Rose)

Sunday, 20 December 2015 13:11

Growing Heat Tolerant Cymbidiums in Tropical Climates

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Growing heat-tolerant cymbidiums (HTCs) in tropical climates is easy and low maintenance. The ease is comparable to growing dendrobium hybrids, which is usually the starting point for beginners. HTCs generally can stand the impact of rainfall; therefore they do not need a rainproof roof.

(by Kobsukh Kaenratana)

Sunday, 20 December 2015 12:48

What Triggers and Supports Flowering in Cymbidiums

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The environment needed to trigger flowering is fairly exact in many species of orchid.

Sunday, 20 December 2015 12:31

Cymbidium Species

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This page is a result of Steve Early's interest in Species Cymbidiums and in the hope that it may create more interest in this group of orchids and also act as a source of some information to those that require it.

Friday, 11 December 2015 06:16

Cymbidium Assassination Tango

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(Memoria Amelia Earhart x Khai Tango)

LIGHT
moderate to bright light
WATER
allow to dry between watering
HUMIDITY
50% is optimum
TEMPERATURE
BLOOM SEASON
blooms in February

 

 

Ed D. was awarded an HCC / AOS with a score of 79 points for his exhibited Cymbidium  Assassination Tango giving it the cultivar name of  'Fires of Spring' in February of 2015.

 

Wednesday, 09 December 2015 20:13

Cymbidium Shifting Sands

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(Pearly Queen x Sand Castle)

LIGHT
moderate to bright light
WATER
allow to dry between watering
HUMIDITY
50% is optimum
TEMPERATURE
BLOOM SEASON
blooms in February

 

 

Congratulations to Cheryl P. for earning Best Cymbidium in Show as well as Best Cymbidum by Advanced Exhibitor at the 2015 Pacific Orchid Exposition.

Wednesday, 09 December 2015 08:09

Cymbidium lowianum

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LIGHT
low to medium indirect light
WATER
do not allow medium to dry out between waterings
HUMIDITY
70% is optimum, air movement is a must
TEMPERATURE
intermediate to warm tolerant
BLOOM SEASON
blooms in fall (red / orange)

 

Ed D. was awarded and HCC / AOS (77 points) on 6 May 2015 for his Cymbidium lowianum 'Compte de Hemptinnen. 

Saturday, 05 December 2015 15:57

Cymbidium Cabaret

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(Woody Wilson x Vogelsang)

LIGHT
moderate to bright light
WATER
allow to dry between watering
HUMIDITY
50% is optimum
TEMPERATURE
BLOOM SEASON
blooms in February

 

 

Ed D. earned 2nd Best in Show at the 2015 NVOS Annual Show in March for his exhibition of Cymbidium Cabaret 'Tyger Jade'as well as an AOS/HCC scoring 75 points in May of 2014.

Thursday, 03 December 2015 22:28

Additional Information

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A collection of Catasetum related links to items of interest found on the Internet, that do not fit in any of the three main catagories.

Thursday, 03 December 2015 20:45

Catasetum Plant Culture

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The cultural information below is a generalization and will apply in most situations; however each grower and growing environment is different. I encourage you to make adjustments based on your experience and growing conditions.

Catasetinae have a distinctive growth and rest period (dormancy). For best plant growth it is important to understand and respect these growth phases. When the plants are in active growth maintain constant root zone moisture and fertilize regularly. This is essential to optimizing the development of new growth. When the plants are dormant little or no water is needed as the pseudobulbs store enough moisture and nutrients to survive the dormancy.

Catasetinae plant culture is not difficult. All it takes is an understanding of the seasonal growth patterns. The plants vegetative state signals to the grower their changing needs. Interpret the signals and make the appropriate cultural adjustments. Here is what to look for:

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